Risdon Brook Dam

Your Water

Fact sheets
Water quality                                     

   Quarterly water quality results
   January to March 2016
   April to June 2016
  July to September 2016 
  October to December 2016     
  January to March 2017 
  April to June 2017

 

From catchment to customer, the journey your water takes to get from the environment to your tap is a complex system of underground pipes, pumps, treatment systems, reservoirs and dams. 

Raw water is collected in our catchment areas, treated to meet the health-based Australian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines and requirements of the Tasmania Public Health Act (this excludes a small number of systems which are not supplied as potable water) and piped to storage areas such as reservoir storage. 

The water is then distributed to households and businesses through a reticulated network of underground pipes and pump stations.

 Water cycle.jpg

To build, monitor and maintain these systems, expensive and constant investment in infrastructure upgrades and renewals is needed.  There are many towns with pipes that in some cases are over 100 years old and must be upgraded to ensure the provision of good quality drinking water.

TasWater will continue to invest in our water infrastructure with the objective of all customers receiving safe drinking water that meets Australian standards.

Frequently asked questions

Chlorine taste or smell

Chlorine is added to public water supplies to provide protection from potentially harmful bacteria.  Chlorine levels are maintained to balance water disinfection and taste.

At time you may notice a taste or smell of chlorine in your water which is normal.  However, if you notice a significant increase of smell or taste and are concerned, please phone TasWater on 13 6992 for more information.

Taste and odour

The taste and odour of water can vary from tap to tap. This may be caused by naturally occurring elements, treatment processes, works in your area and the state of your internal pipes and taps.  Drinking water contains small amounts of naturally occurring minerals including Manganese, Magnesium and Iron.  Other elements are added to ensure water is appropriately treated and is safe for drinking purposes.  Regular testing is conducted to ensure water meets the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines and the Tasmanian Public Health Act (1997).

Cloudy, milky or bubbly water

Air bubbles can cause water to have a cloudy or milky appearance.  Water is distributed under pressure through our water pipes, and when it reaches your tap, the pressure is released and may result in air bubbles in your water.  If air bubbles are causing a cloudy or milky appearance in your water, this is harmless and will disappear as the air rises out of your glass from bottom to top.

Dirty or discoloured water

In older buildings, discolouring in the water can be a sign of rusting galvanised iron pipes in your internal plumbing.  This will usually be most obvious first thing in the morning or after extended periods of no water use.  Iron or sediments in the water may also give it a dirty appearance.  If you  experience yellow-coloured water or water that appears dirty, turn your tap on full for at least 30 seconds to flush out the impacted water before use.  If the problem persists, you may wish to consult a plumber or contact TasWater for assistance.

Blue-green stains

Blue-green staining on household bathroom fittings is a sign of copper corrosion.  Staining or bluish water can occur when water is stagnant in pipes for an extended period, in new or corroding pipes, or as a result of older household electrical wiring being earthed to a copper pipe.  If you experience blue-green staining on bathroom fittings, turn your tap on full for at least 30 seconds to flush out the impacted water before use.  If the problem persists, you may wish to consult a plumber, electrician or contact TasWater for assistance.  Fixing dripping taps may help reduce localised staining.

Metallic taste

Water with a metallic taste is most likely a sign of corroding plumbing in older galvanised iron and copper pipe works in your home.  A metallic taste is mostly likely to occur first thing in the morning or after extended periods of no water use.  If you experience a metallic taste in your water, turn your tap on full for at least 30 seconds to flush out the stagnant water.  The water will be replaced with fresh water from our reticulated water supply.  If the problem persists, you may wish to consult a plumber or contact TasWater for assistance.

Fluoride

TasWater is directed to fluoridate drinking water supplies by the Minister of Health in accordance with the Fluoridation Act 1968. For more information see our FAQ here and a statement from the CEO of the National Health and Medical Research Council here.

From catchment to customer, the journey your water takes to get from the environment to your tap 
is a complex system of underground pipes, pumps, treatment systems, reservoirs and dams. 
Raw water is collected in our catchment areas, treated to meet the health-based Australian Drinking 
Water Quality Guidelines and requirements of the Tasmania Public Health Act (this excludes a small 
number of systems which are not supplied as potable water) and piped to storage areas such as 
reservoir storage.  
The water is then distributed to households and businesses through a reticulated network of 
underground pipes and pump stations.